Fight For Your Future Creativity

Fight For Your Future Creativity

Follow me

Uchechi

Hi! I'm a web designer, poet, and creative career coach. I write about how to become more resilient as a creative person, find your voice and use it to step into your purpose.
Follow me
How To Fight For Your Creativity

Photo by Johann Walter Bantz on Unsplash

(more…)

Your Future Self Can Support Your Creativity

Your Future Self Can Support Your Creativity

Follow me

Uchechi

Hi! I'm a web designer, poet, and creative career coach. I write about how to become more resilient as a creative person, find your voice and use it to step into your purpose.
Follow me

 

Your Future Self Is Cheering For Your Creativity

 

 

dear creative,
your future self is there to help you become more courageous. can you ask for help?

let me tell you a story.

There are days when I feel defeated. I don’t know what I am doing, but I know that I have my eyes on my north star. This is the impact I want to have in my own life, which will then be of service to the small world around me and maybe even reach the greater world.

I have always believed in focusing on my impact over a specific job title or career track. I want to help as many people as possible find their voice, know that it matters and use it to help them own their vision and share it to serve the world around them.

This has been the same goal for many years.

But, I am also very human. I have difficult days. Running a business comes with challenging moments. While there are the days when I can work remotely (on the beach) or from home, there are also days when it is overwhelming to manage the daily activities of running any business.

But I do this work because I deeply believe that when we find our voice, we find the power (and the courage) to rewrite our story and decide how we will share it with the world.

And it is these stories that impact how we show up in our personal and professional lives and how we engage with our customers.

on my most difficult days, I summon the courage of my future self. This is the woman I want to be and the woman I am aspiring to be like. She is the woman I cannot yet fully know or see. She is always changing and always shifting, but I know she exists.

When this moment seems difficult, I summon her courage. I know that if I try just a little bit, she will step in and support me.

So, can you ask your future self to stand beside you? Can you look back at who you were a year ago and remember who you are now?

This self gives me hope because she reminds me that we will always change and evolve. Sometimes those changes serve us and sometimes they derail us, but we always have the ability to reset and create a different future.

 

Keep going dear creative. I want to see your brilliance.

 

Love,

Your Future Self

 

You have everything you need to start

You have everything you need to start

Follow me

Uchechi

Hi! I'm a web designer, poet, and creative career coach. I write about how to become more resilient as a creative person, find your voice and use it to step into your purpose.
Follow me
Just start your next creative move. You have everything you need.

Photo by William Stitt on Unsplash

 

Dear creative,

You have everything you need to start.

Let me tell you a story.

Last year, I wanted to start blogging consistently.  I researched my blogging niche. I made lists of all the topics I wanted to discuss on my blog. I even “tested the market” to see if people in my network would be interested in the subject. Although my friends said “yes”,I still continued researching. I compiled websites and documents for days, and I still did more research.

It took me many months before I actually committed and started blogging regularly. So, I am sharing this story because I want you to know that you are not alone. We’ve all been there.  We know we need to start something, but for some reason we don’t.

Here’s what I discovered during my blogging research:

  • I did not start because I thought I had to write a certain type of blog in order to find readers.
  • I did not start because I was waiting for the “right time” to start my blog. There was always some work challenge that needed my attention first.
  • I didn’t start because I had convinced myself that there was a “right time.”

There is no right time to start your creative career.

I realized that there is no right time.

Start now. Pick the next thing. Do you need to send an email? Do you have an email address? Send the email. Do you need to create a WordPress account? Do you have a working wifi connection? Do you have a computer? Create that account.Do you need to call that advisor to help you figure out how to get your company back on track? Call the advisor. Send them a text. Ask them to tell you when the best time is for them to talk.

I’m writing this because one of the things I’ve discovered that has made all the difference in my creative career is what David Kadavy calls “the heart to start.”

 

Can you give yourself permission to start?

Trusting your creative voice and giving yourself permission to start isn’t usually a question of resources. It’s often a conversation about creative confidence. Most of the tools I mentioned above are things many of us have.  You can go to a remote village in the far corners of the world and find a wifi connection, even it is somewhat weak.

Usually, we’re struggling to find the courage to start.

Usually, we’re struggling to find the courage to start, the willingness to put aside the fear of judgment, ridicule, the comments from the haters. And sometimes, like myself, we are more afraid of the greatness that could ensue. Someone could start reading your blog. Some of the comments could be cheering you on. Imagine that? Imagine how that would look and feel.

There’s a narrative that says you have to have it all figured out in order to move forward. I don’t know how it got started or who started it because it is very dangerous.

It does not account for the fact that most of us do not need to have everything figured out in order to do the next thing. And most of the time we can not see the thing after that if we don’t take one small step.

What if it all worked out?

And often, that one step becomes two steps and then there’s the ripple effect. For every action of ours, there’s a reaction. We fear the negative reactions, but what about the positive reactions? What about the person who needs your work, and lets you know just how much they need it in the comments section.

What about thinking about what could happen if it all worked out?

Conclusion

The word perfect (as a verb) means “to improve through making.”So, you can only get better at your craft if you just keep making. When we focus so much on the end result, we rob ourselves of what we might discover in the process. We rob ourselves of the true gift.

I did say that you have what you need to get started. But you might feel like you don’t have what you need to follow through. Guess what? You can’t know that yet. You won’t know that yet.

 

Just start. Then see what happens. You have everything you need.

 

I hope you keep going. I want to see your brilliance.

 

Love,

Your Future Self

Why You Should Reference Your Creative History

Why You Should Reference Your Creative History

Follow me

Uchechi

Hi! I'm a web designer, poet, and creative career coach. I write about how to become more resilient as a creative person, find your voice and use it to step into your purpose.
Follow me

 

Why All Creative People Need To Reference Their Past Work

Photo by Kévin Langlais on Unsplash

 

Dear Creative,

On your hardest days, I want you to look back and reference yourself. Reach back into your history find a time when you, yes you, found a way to become your own creative superhero in spite of everything. This will be your defining moment.  This will be your blueprint. this will be the guidepost for the way forward.

Yes, I’m encouraging you to reference yourself.

Let me tell you a story

I love old photos. I love the ripped edges, the looks on the faces. There’s a snapshot of who that person was, and it’s also an acknowledgment of who they were becoming at that moment. This is how we document history.  I’ve been looking at my old photos again.

Honor Your Creative History

I’ve been thinking about how our histories as creatives are being made each and every day.  Old photos are no longer black and white images from 100 years ago. They are the photos from my college graduation, the awkward itchy dress from that birthday party. They become personal and professional reference material of who we were and who we are becoming. On my hardest days, I’ve pulled out these photos. I needed to remember the girl I was back then. I needed to remember the creative strength it took to do some of the things that seem so impossible today.

I needed to reference myself.

How Do We Create In the Face Of Devastation?

This week marks my younger brother’s anniversary of his passing. It is also the week of his birthday. He would have been 35 this coming Monday. But he is not here.

I’ve been meditating (and crying) a lot this week. So, as I was meditating and holding my hand on my chest, I started crying. I was remembering the 22-year-old girl who went through so much in her last year of university. The things I learned from the woman I was (and became) during his passing are still there. I had just forgotten them.

  • My brother died 3 months before I graduated. I had to finish my 50-page honors thesis and cry my way through all of my classes. I was not a fully functioning human being at the time. How could I be?
  • My world blew up. Everything I knew was turned on its head and aI no longer knew who I thought I knew myself to be. This was a devastating time. During my last few months, my mentor, teacher, and friend June Jordan’s cancer came back with a full force and she died within a year.
  • As I stood up there on that stage and gave the valedictory address, I laughed and cried at the same time. This was the best and worst day of my life. My mentor was supposed to introduce me, but she was so sick.  My brother was supposed to be there, but he was dead.

The Power Of Referencing Your Past Creative Work

As I look back, I think about the sadness of the day and the joy of the day, but there was also the triumph of that day. How was I able to do the impossible. There was also breaking life into what seemed impossible and doing it. There was also my ability to hold my grief and my fear and my sadness and my joy all at the same time. So now, as I sit here meditating, I come back to that young woman. She was only a few years out of girlhood, and she had to find a way to get through that day.

I don’t know how she did it. I don’t know how she held the best and worst day of her life in both hands. I don’t know how her hands didn’t shake and collapse her to the ground, right there on that stage in front of everyone.

Honor Your Creative Courage

I don’t know why she did not give up. She could have said screw this whole thing and stayed in bed for weeks. She could have chosen to not graduate and take the remaining classes when she could have just left and never seen the walls of a university classroom again.

I would not blame her. Most people would understand.

It is hard to imagine that I am that same woman. I know she is strong and I know she cried in the bathroom while she waited to take the stage at the graduation theater. I know she cried while she was on stage.

Think back to a time when you were own creative superhero.  What did it teach you? How did it change you? What lessons can you apply now?

Keep going dear creative.  I want to see your brilliance.

 

Love,

Your Future Self

No One Has Your Creative DNA

No One Has Your Creative DNA

Follow me

Uchechi

Hi! I'm a web designer, poet, and creative career coach. I write about how to become more resilient as a creative person, find your voice and use it to step into your purpose.
Follow me

 

No One Has Your Creative DNA

 

 

dear creative,

No one has your creative DNA.

If you do not do the thing that your heart knows it needs to do, no one else will do it for you. No one else can do it for you.

Of course, there will be artists to come after you. There were artists that came before you. They paved the way. they lit the path so you could see where you could place your foot and continue walking.

But they were not you.

They inspired you, they gave you ideas. they showed you just how far you might be able to go.

They arrived in the world with their own biological and creative DNA.

Let me tell you a story.

 

DNA is defined as the master molecule of every cell. It contains vital information that gets passed on to each successive generation. It coordinates the making of itself as well as other molecules (proteins). If it is changed slightly, serious consequences may result. If it is destroyed beyond repair, the cell dies.

No two people have the same biological DNA.

But the lineage we come from does inform our DNA. So family members can have shared (but not the same) DNA.

The same is true for creative DNA. It’s the creative information that gets passed on to each successive generation.  Our creative DNA does not come from shared blood but shared the creative experience.

 

 

No One Has Your Creative DNA

 

Last month, I wrote about creative ancestry and defined it as the lineage of creative people from whom which your work is descended.

Our creative ancestors may not look like us or may come from a different time period and a different country, but they have informed the cells and the base structure of our creative work.

In the same way that no two people share the same biological DNA, no two people share the same creative DNA.

We might have the same relatives (people who informed our work) but our creative body will do something different with this information and make it something that only we can claim, own and share with the world.

Is this making sense yet?

 

No one else can do your creative work.

If no one has your creative DNA, then no one can do the work you were meant to do in the world. They can do the same type of work, but it will not be infused with the distinct creative molecules that only you have.

On your hardest days, remember this. On the days when you feel like you have nothing to contribute, remember this. When you think that your voice does not matter, remember this. If not you, then who? There will be no one to share the truth in the way only you know and only you can.

 Remember that there is always room for your unique voice. There has to be room for you. You have never existed before. Your creative DNA has never existed before.

Trust yourself dear creative.

 

Keep going.  I want to see your brilliance

 

Love,

Your Future Self

 

 

Why You Should Write Creative Work Vows

Why You Should Write Creative Work Vows

Follow me

Uchechi

Hi! I'm a web designer, poet, and creative career coach. I write about how to become more resilient as a creative person, find your voice and use it to step into your purpose.
Follow me
The power of writing creative work vows instead of new year's resolutions

photo credit: chriswojdak.com

 

Dear Creative,

Today is Valentine’s Day. Most of us will see our social media feeds full of posts about love and family and romance and all that good stuff. I encourage you to post anything about love.  Valentine’s Day is a good day to talk about love.

Love is dope.

Love also conjures images of commitment. It makes me think of the promises we make to the people we love. It also conjures images of my commitment to my creative work.

  • What commitments are you making to your work in the world?
  • How are you keeping your promises to your gifts?
  • How are you showing your love for your work?

These are difficult questions for me to ask. Although I can say that I’m trying, I know there’s more I can do.

In January, I tried something different. Instead of creating new year’s resolutions, I wrote vows. I made promises instead of a list of things I wanted to accomplish.

Resolutions don’t seem to work for me. I write down all the things  I hope to accomplish, but then I end up feeling defeated and the piece of paper finds its way to the back of the pile.

This year, I wrote vows instead of goals.

Let me tell you a story.

I remember my wedding day. I stood at the altar and pulled out a piece of paper and shared my hopes and dreams with everyone. I had plans. I had commitments. I wanted to listen, to pay attention to make room for my partner to be who he was. During my wedding ceremony, I recited my vows. My partner also shared his promises to me.

These were my vows. They were not something I would give up on if I didn’t achieve them within a month. They were not a long list of things I would do even though I know I was not yet ready to do them. They were a public dedication to my commitment and a blueprint for how I wanted to love his personality and myself in relation to him.

Creative Work Vows Encourage Us To Keep Our Promises

A vow is defined as a set of promises one makes to another person or thing.

I think of wedding vows. They are the most common. But something that’s also very interesting about vows is that they are usually made in front of others.

Having witnesses matters. During my wedding, I stood up in front of others. I wanted it to be known that I was committing to this thing, and why it mattered to me. This was my vow.

On the other hand, a goal is a defined task.

A vow encourages us to keep our word because it is a promise, a declaration that something will or will not be done.  A goal is defined as the result or achievement toward which effort is directed.

  • What if vows were not just for marriage?
  • What if we could use them and apply them to our creative work and the impact we want to have in the world?

Is a promise a specific outcome whereas a goal is a result? It seems the person making the promise has more at stake than the person setting a goal.

 

 

How do they work?

  1. You are more likely to keep your promise.
  2. You are more likely to tell others about your vow.
  3. You are less focused on the outcome and more concerned about the promise.

I’ve been thinking about vows for valentine’s day because we associate vows with commitment. We vow to things we are committed to. But there’s something else I realized about a vow and how it differs from a goal.

We usually make vows over the course of a longer time period.

Wedding vows are promises we make and commit to keeping over the course of our marriage. Religious vows are promises we commit to upholding over the course of our time as a religious person. Even elected officials make a commitment that maps out what they will do and what they promise to uphold during that time frame.

So, here’s what I’ve discovered about my vows.

At the beginning of the year, I vowed to make room for my voice and to share it with the world. I do this via the  “dear creative” letters. I vowed to use my voice and to use it to inspire others to do the same.  I made sure I had witnesses. I made a promise to my creative ancestors and announced it on Instagram.

My creative ancestors are the people whose work has influenced mine and impacted how I created. I vowed to them. I vowed to them because there needed to be the public aspect of vowing.

I take my promises seriously. If I say I will do something, I do it. I don’t try to do it, I do it.

The goal is the weekly act of writing, publishing and promoting the blog post.   The promise and vow are to say the things that I need to say and to share what I know in hopes of helping others.

I’ve noticed a few things about the power of creative work vows:

    • I keep my promises because my word is important to me and others.
    • I focus on the big picture. Instead of thinking about publishing a blog post, I focus more on my vow to share my voice.
    • Making this promise in the presence of others keeps me focused and committed in a way a list of goals does not.

Creative vows can be more powerful than New Year’s resolutions.

Goals are a list of things you want to achieve. They are an outcome of your effort.

 This is your word. This is a promise. Promises are never made lightly.

So, what do you want to vow to do this year? How can you make a vow to your work?

Keep going. I want to see your brilliance.